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ALVERO, ALICIA

BEELER, JEFF

BODNAR, RICHARD

BOROD, JOAN

BROWN, BRUCE

BRUMBAUGH, CLAUDIA

BRUMBERG, JOSHUA

CHACKO, ANIL

FAN, JIN

FIENUP, DANIEL

FOLDI, NANCY

GOODWIN, RENEE

HALPERIN, JEFFREY

HEMMES, NANCY

JOHNSON, RAY

JONES, EMILY

LANSON, ROBERT

LI, ANDREA

NOMURA, YOKO

PYTTE, CAROLYN

RAMSEY, PHILLIP

RANALDI, ROBERT

SNEED, JOEL

STORBECK, JUSTIN

STURMEY, PETER

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EMILY JONES

Title Assistant Professor
Area Clinical Psychology
Ph.D. SUNY Stony Brook
Office A-334 Science Building
E-mail emily.jones@qc.cuny.edu
Office Phone 718-997-3244
   

Professional Activities:

    Look soon for information about the Annual Conference on Best Practices in the Education of Young Children with Developmental Disabilities. Coming in Spring 2009. 2008 Brochure.

Research Description:

My research involves the development and examination of interventions to address core deficits in children with developmental disabilities, specifically, autism and Down syndrome. Each group presents with a unique pattern of impairments (including joint attention deficits in children with autism; requesting impairments in children with Down syndrome) that creates significant obstacles for development and prevents access to typical opportunities. Children with autism show specific impairments in the development of joint attention skills. Joint attention skills are fundamental early developing social-communication skills in which a child and caregiver share attention on an interesting object/event for the sole purpose of interacting with each other about that object/event. Joint attention skills impact later social and communication development. Within a longitudinal study of joint attention intervention in children with autism I am also conducting a series of sub-studies examining multiple aspects of joint attention intervention. Specifically, I am examining procedures to improve the effectiveness of intervention to address initiating joint attention, affect associated with joint attention, and joint attention interactions with peer partners. Children with Down syndrome also show specific impairments in early communication skills. In this case, requesting and verbal imitation are specifically impaired and, like joint attention in children with autism, these impact later development. Current studies focus on intervention to address verbal imitation and requesting skills, as well as feeding and social skills in infants and young children with Down syndrome.

Selected Publications:

    Jones, E. A. (in press). Establishing response and stimulus classes for initiating joint attention in children with autism. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Jones, E. A., Feeley, K. M., & Blackburn, C. (in press). A preliminary study of intervention addressing early developing requesting behaviours in young infants with Down syndrome. Down Syndrome Research and Practice.

    Jones, E. A., & Feeley, K. M. (2007). Parent implemented joint attention intervention for preschoolers with autism. Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Applied Behavior Analysis, 2, 252-268.

    Jones, E. A., Feeley, K. M., & Takacs, J. (2007). Teaching spontaneous responses to young children with autism. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 40, 565-570.

    Feeley, K. M., & Jones, E. A. (2007). Strategies to address challenging behavior in children with Down syndrome. Down Syndrome Research and Practice, Advance Online Publications.

    Feeley, K. M., & Jones, E. A. (2007). Teaching spontaneous responses to a young child with Down syndrome. Down Syndrome Research and Practice, Advance Online Publications.

    Jones, E. A., Carr, E.G., & Feeley, K. M. (2006). Multiple effects of joint attention intervention for children with autism. Behavior Modification, 30, 782-834.

    Feeley, K. M., & Jones, E. A. (2006). Addressing challenging behavior in children with Down syndrome: The use of applied behavior analysis for assessment and intervention. Down Syndrome Research and Practice, 11, 64-77.

    Jones, E. A., & Carr, E.G. (2004). Joint attention in children with autism: Theory and intervention. Focus on Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 19, 13-26.