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In the Fall of 2013, our department will welcome two new faculty members:
Professor Felicia Madimenos was recently awarded a PhD at the University of Oregon. Her research focuses on the influence of human reproductive ecology, skeletal health, and energetics and is strongly rooted in life history theory. Specifically, her research uses an integrative, biocultural approach to explore the physiological and behavioral strategies that Indigenous Ecuadorian Shuar women adopt to meet the elevated costs of reproduction.
In the Fall of 2013, Professor Madimenos will offer two sections of Anth 102: Introduction to Human Evolution, on M, W, at 9:15 AM - 10:30 AM and 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM.


Professor Karine Tache was awarded a PhD in Archaeology at Simon Fraser University (British Columbia, Canada). Her doctoral dissertation, entitled Structure and Regional Diversity of the Meadowood Interaction Sphere, focused one of the earliest and largest interaction spheres established in Northeastern North America and highlighted the important relationship, under certain ecological conditions, between the creation of interaction spheres, the development of prestige technologies, and the emergence of socioeconomic inequalities. Her research combines archaeological and environmental data with organic residue analysis in order to investigate early pottery uses in Northeastern North America.
In the Fall of 2013, Professor Tache will offer two sections of Anth 103: Introduction to Archaeology, on T, TH at 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM and 12:15 PM - 1:30 PM.

Spring-Summer 2013
Professor Strassler's book "Refracted Visions: Popular Photography and National Modernity in Java," was awarded the Collier Prize from the Society for Visual Anthropology.
Larissa Swedell just received a grant from the National Science Foundation for a project on the social behavior and physiology of chacma baboons in South Africa conducted in collaboration with Drs. Steffen Foerster (Barnard College) and Steve Monfort (Smithsonian).
In July of 2013, a new volume edited by Kate Pechenkina and Mark Oxenham, entitled Bioarchaeology of East Asia: Movement, Contact, Health was published by the University Press of Florida. This volume integrates research on migration, diet, and diverse aspects of health through the study of human skeletal collections in a region that developed varying forms of agriculture. East Asia’s complex population movements and cultural practices provide biological markers that allow for testing of multiple hypotheses about interactions in past communities. Exploring the interplay between humans and their environments, papers in this volume millet agriculture, mobile pastoralism with limited cereal farming, and rice farming in combination with reliance on marine resources, Many of these subsistence strategies that are more or less exclusive to East Asia.
A new paper by Professor Alex Bauer, entitled "Multivocality and 'Wikiality': the Epistemology and Ethics of a Pragmatic Archaeology," came out in a volume edited by G. Scarre and R. Coningham "Appropriating the Past: Philosophical Perspectives on the Practice of Archaeology," published by Cambridge University Press.
Congratulations to our graduating seniors
who have been accepted to graduate programs
:
  • Raquel Lamela Lopez was accepted to the Doctoral Program in Anthropology of GSUC-CUNY, with a Graduate Teaching Fellowship.
  • Steven Esposito was accepted to the Doctoral Program in Anthropology of GSUC-CUNY, with an NSF-IGERT Fellowship.
  • The Vice President of the Anthro Club, Al Foe, will be enrolling in the Doctoral Program in Archaeology of the University of Illinois - Chicago.
  • The President of the Anthro Club, Arianna Stimpfl, will be enrolling in the Doctoral Program in Near Eastern Archaeology at Binghamton University.
  • Elizabeth Evangelou will also be enrolling at Binghamton University, in a Doctoral Program in Archaeology and Biological Anthropology.

  • Anthropology Honors and Awards 2013
    Hortense Powdermaker Award: Cecilia Vega Britez and Joanna Lund-Pops
    Faculty Award: Raquel Lamela Lopez, Joanna Lund-Pops, Elizabeth Evangelou
    Paul Mahler Memorial Award: Raquel Lamela Lopez, Elizabeth Evangelou, and Steven Esposito
    Lynn Ceci Archaeology Award: Aldo Foe
    Most Promising Student Award: Rebecca Wojsnis
    Frank Spencer Memorial Scholarship Award: Alissa Penn and Xu Shan
    Service Award: Arianna Stimpfl
    SENIOR MAJORS HONORS: Raquel Lamela Lopez, Joanna Lund-Pops, Elizabeth Evangelou, Caitlin Locurto, Richa Nayyar, Steven Esposito, Aldo Foe, Charlotte Greenbaum, Elizabeth Staszewski, Lois Song, Nina Lazerow, Vivian Xu, Nia Bert, Ester Park, Patricia Miranda, Jasleen Chandhoke, Cecilia Vega Britez, Ximena Gallego, Brigid Dolan, Melissa Pena, Khealzaree Ahmedzay, Yojeiry Corona, Carolina Carvajal, Elyssa Nucero, Michelle Ammons, Erez Klein, Karen Shum, Sotaro Trenholm, Jean Kapkanoff, Elyssa Hirmes, Arianna Stimpfl, Silvia Carpio, Daniel Michel
    News from our alumni:
  • Chris Parisano received a National Science Foundation Graduate Research fellowship for his study of the relationships that people in Lima, Peru, have with archeological sites.
  • Jason R. Abdale recently published a book about the Battle of Teutoburg, which was fought between the Romans and Germanic tribal peoples in AD 9. His book is entitled "Four Days in September: The Battle of Teutoburg" and is available from Trafford Publishing.
  • Justin Yoo, who is currently working on his PhD at King's College London, recently published a review of the Seventh World Archaeological Congress.

  • Fall 2012
    Professor Larissa Swedell received a $20,000 research grant from the Wenner-Gren Foundation for her fieldwork project on sociality and social bonds in baboons.
    A new book by Professor Kevin Birth "Objects of Time: How Things Shape Temporality" was published by Palgrave Macmillan Press. This book looks at how the objects we use to think about time shape our thoughts. Such objects empower us to think about time certain ways, but they also contain hidden assumptions about time that deflect our awareness away from the complicated rhythms of our lives and our world. Because time ties together so many aspects of our lives, this book is able to explore the nexus of objects, cognition, culture, and even biology, and to do so in relationship to globalization. By using ethnographic and historical data, Birth argues that we must recognize the cognitive effects of our timekeeping devices, and that we must also recognize that they do not adequately capture many important aspects of time or life.
    Summer 2012
    Timothy Pugh received a two year grant from the National Science Foundation supporting his archaeological project (Factionalism, Trade Goods, and the Colonial Process in Petén, Guatemala) in Petén, Guatemala. His article Contact and Missionization at Tayasal, Petén, Guatemala appeared in Journal of Field Archaeology.
    Professor John Collins has been appointed as the director of the Latin American and Latino Studies Program.
    Professor Tom Plummer published a new article "The Hard Stuff of Culture: Oldowan Archaeology at Kanjera South, Kenya" in the June issue of Popular Archaeology.
    Kate Pechenkina has a chapter entitled "From Morphometrics to Holistics: The Emergence of Paleopathology in China" in the new edited volume by Jane Buikstra and Charlotte Roberts, "The Global History of Paleopathology: Pioneers and Prospects" published by Oxford University Press in June 2012.
    A new paper by Professors Larissa Swedell and Tom Plummer, entitled "A Papionin Multilevel Society as a Model for Hominin Social Evolution" appeared in the May issue of the International Journal of Primatology.

    In April 2012, Sara Stinson's volume (co-edited with Barry Bogin and Dennis O’Rourke), "Human Biology: An Evolutionary and Biocultural Perspective" was published by Wiley-Blackwell. This comprehensive introduction to the field of human biology covers all the major areas of the field: genetic variation, variation related to climate, infectious and non-infectious diseases, aging, growth, nutrition, and demography. Written by four expert authors working in close collaboration, this second edition has been thoroughly updated to provide undergraduate and graduate students with two new chapters: one on race and culture and their ties to human biology, and the other a concluding summary chapter highlighting the integration and intersection of the topics covered in the book.
    Mandana Limbert was awarded a mid-career faculty fellowship from the Mellon Foundation, directed through the Graduate Center. The fellowship allows her to participate in a faculty seminar with the Committee on Religion at the GC and to pursue work on her next book project.

    In July of 2011, Omri Elisha's book "Moral Ambition: Mobilization and Social Outreach in Evangelical Megachurches" was published by California University Press.

    In this evocative ethnography, Omri Elisha examines the hopes, frustrations, and activist strategies of American evangelical Christians as they engage socially with local communities. Focusing on two Tennessee megachurches, Moral Ambition reaches beyond political controversies over issues such as abortion, same-sex marriage, and public prayer to highlight the ways that evangelicals at the grassroots of the Christian Right promote faith-based causes intended to improve the state of social welfare. The book shows how these ministries both help churchgoers embody religious virtues and create provocative new opportunities for evangelism on a public scale. Elisha challenges conventional views of U.S. evangelicalism as narrowly individualistic, elucidating instead the inherent contradictions that activists face in their efforts to reconcile religious conservatism with a renewed interest in compassion, poverty, racial justice, and urban revivalism.

    Anthropology Awards 2011
    Hortense Powdermaker Award: Kimberly Seiler
    Faculty Award: Kimberly Seiler and Emily Wiegers
    Paul Mahler Memorial Award: Joshua Wilcox
    Lynn Ceci Archaeology Award: Joseph Birkmann and Emily Wiegers
    Frank Spencer Memorial Scholarship Award: Elizabeth Evangelou
    Most Promising Junior Student Award: Saule Buozyte and Barbara Hsu
    Service Award: Joshua Wilcox
    Senior Honor Thesis:
    Marta Pitts, Josh Wilcox, Jennifer Meza, Joseph Birkmann, and Seema Choudhary

    Majors Graduating with Honors:
    Kimberly Seiler, Emily Wiegers, Nicole Brigati, Alexander Lord, Joseph Birkmann, Marta Pitts, Juliana Giraldo Ramirez, Lauren Uss, Roneil Boodram, Joshua Wilcox, Matilde Chanax-Gonzalez, Seema Choudhary, Gregory Thoma, Junaid Mundiya, Andrew Pang, Alon Beer, Lielle Levy, Jennifer Lowenwirt, Kristina Georgiou, Jennifer Meza, Sasha Deen, Zuha Mirza, Amela Cekic, and Diego Palaguachi
    Minors Graduating with Honors:
    Noura Embabi, Daniela Velez, Jordana Lovett, Stephanie Wentz, Kenzo Yasuda, Rachel Geier, Cristina Toro, Edward Brust, Jessica Chan, Kashaf Mian, Laura Sfiroudis, Rafael Vargas, and Kenneth Nino.

    Junior Honors:
    Joanna Lund-Pops, Saule Buozyte, Barbra Hsu, Elizabeth Evangelou, Richa Nayyar, Brigid Dolan, Elizabeth Staszewski, Kathy Dimos, Mauricio Guerra, Giustina Lombardo, Jean Kapkanoff, Elyssa Hirmes, Leslie Amar, Talisa Feliciano, Karen Shum, Alicia Galdamez, Andrey Valenkov, Nardai Mootoo, Brittany Schuler, Vanessa Joseph, Alejandra Martinez, Sarah Weintraub, Casey Paganetti, Khealzaree Ahmedzay, and Nicole Shaoulian.

    A paper by Professor John Collins entitled "Culture, Content, and the Enclosure of Human Being" was published in Radical History Review 2011(109):121-135.
    Winter 2010-2011

    In Spring 2011, The Anthropology Department invites you to register for
    “VOICES OF NEW YORK”

    Anth/LCD 288 Voices of New York
    Mon/Wed 10:50~12:05

    In this research seminar you will be guided by two well-published researchers in language in society to make your own discoveries about how New Yorkers use language.

    For further information contact the Professors Miki Makihara (miki.makihara@qc.cuny.edu) and Michael Newman (Michael.newman@qc.cunyh.edu)
    Fall 2010

    CUNY Graduate Center biological anthropology student,
    Scott Blumenthal,
    presented his research to the Anthropology Society this coming Wednesday Nov. 10th. The event will take place in PH 311 (the bone lab) at 12:15.


    "Stable isotopes in wild gorilla feces document seasonal dietary change and rainfall patterns."

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of gorilla feces and plant foods is used to quantify short-term intra-annual diet changes in four wild gorillas from Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda. Gorillas have a diverse diet including herbaceous leaves, fruit, tree leaves, pith, and peel, and are known to be seasonal frugivores. Carbon isotope analysis of staple foods, cumulatively comprising ~96% of dietary intake, demonstrates that fruits consumed by these gorillas exhibit more enriched d13C values relative to other dietary items. Stable carbon isotope values of gorilla feces from these individuals, each represented by least two samples per month, exhibit several distinct peaks. These isotopically identified dietary changes are corroborated by feeding behavior recorded concurrently with feces collection, which confirms a similar pattern in corresponding increases in observed fruit consumption to greater than 40% of total diet. The carbon isotope peaks can thus be interpreted as recording seasonal shifts in frugivory. Stable nitrogen isotope values of gorilla feces correspond in time to seasonal rainfall patterns. Correlation of isotope patterns from multiple individuals suggests that isotope data from a single animal records the behavior of the group. Previous work on the diets of these same gorillas provides a rare opportunity to compare a high-resolution isotope record of known seasonal changes in dietary composition in a wild primate with variation in nutrient intake and dietary quality. In addition to reporting isotope values for an undersampled taxon, this work highlights the limitations of bulk tissue analysis for reconstructing both living and fossil primate diets."

    Refreshments will be served.


    Timothy Pugh and CUNY doctoral student Yuko Shiratori were awarded a dissertation improvement grant from the National Science Foundation to fund the project Maya Luxury Goods at Contact: Transformation of Value in a Hybrid Economy.
    Spring 2010
    In May 2010, Alexander Bauer's book (co-edited with Anna Agbe-Davies), Social Archaeologies of Trade and Exchange will be published by Left Coast Press. The goal of this volume is to recognize trade as a fundamentally social activity concerned not only with the movement of goods, but also on the social context and consequences of that exchange. The contributions discuss trade on a range of scales and themes such as exchange as a communicative act, the ways in which exchange transforms the relationship between people and things, the significance of agency and power in contexts of trade, and how sites of consumption and discard speak to processes of exchange.
    Professor Timothy Pugh was awarded a grant from the Wenner-Gren Foundation to support his project “The Colonial Process at Tayasal, Petén, Guatemala.”

    In June 2010, Prof. Mandana Limbert's book, In the Time of Oil: Piety, Memory, and Social Life in an Omani Town, will be published by Stanford University Press. Focusing on shifting structures of governance and new forms of sociality as well as on the changes brought by mass schooling, piped water, and the fracturing of close ties with East Africa, Mandana Limbert shows how personal memories and local histories produce divergent notions about proper social conduct, piety, and gendered religiosity. With close attention to the subtleties of everyday life and the details of archival documents, poetry, and local histories, Limbert provides a rich historical ethnography of oil development, piety, and social life on the Arabian Peninsula.

    In May 2010, Prof. Karen Strassler's book, Refracted Visions: Popular Photography and National Modernity in Java, was published by Duke University Press. In this book, Karen Strassler argues that popular photographic practices have played a crucial role in the making of modern national subjects in postcolonial Java. Contending that photographic genres cultivate distinctive ways of seeing and positioning oneself and others within the affective, ideological, and temporal location of Indonesia, she examines genres ranging from state identification photos to pictures documenting family rituals.

    Fall 2009
    In October 2009, Prof. Murphy Halliburton's book, Mudpacks and Prozac: Experiencing Ayurvedic, Biomedical, and Religious Healing, an ethngraphic study of healing in India, was published by Left Coast Press. This book tells about people seeking psychiatric healing choose from an almost dizzying array of therapies-from the medicated mudpacks of Ayurveda, to the pharmacopeia of Western biomedicine, to the spiritual pathways of the world's religions. How do we choose, what do the treatments offer, and how do they cure? In Mudpacks and Prozac, Murphy Halliburton investigates the very different ways in which Western, Ayurvedic, and religious (Christian, Muslim, and Hindu) healing systems define psychiatric problems and cures. He describes people's embodied experiences of therapies that range from soothing to frightening, and explores how enduring pleasure or pain affects healing. And through evocative portraits of patients in Kerala, India-a place of incredible cultural diversity that has become a Mecca for alternative medicine-Halliburton shows how sociopolitical changes around the globe may be limiting the ways in which people seek and experience health care, with negative effects on our quality of health and quality of life.
    John Collins' "A razão barroca do patrimônio baiano: Contos de tesouro e histórias de ossadas no Centro Histórico de Salvador," ["Bahian Patrimony's Baroque Reason: Treasure Tales and Skeletal Histories in Salvador's Historical Center,"] has appeared in the Revista de Antropologia, 51(1): 29-73. Revista de Antropologia is one of Latin America's leading social scientific journals and Professor Collins' article was also presented at the First Annual Annual Brazilian-U.S. Anthropological Conference, University of São Paulo, Summmer 2008.
    Omri Elisha (Ph.D. NYU 2005) has joined the Department of Anthropology as an Assistant Professor starting Fall 2009. Omri Elisha is a cultural anthropologist whose research interests include anthropology of religion, Evangelicalism/Christianity, urban anthropology, and North American ethnography.
    In the fall of 2009 Professor Elisha was awarded the eighth annual Cultural Horizons Prize by Society for Cultural Anthropology for his article "Moral Ambitions of Grace: The Paradox of Compassion and Accountability in Evangelical Faith-Based Activism" published in Cultural Anthropology 23, no. 1 (February 2008): 154-189.
    Tom Plummer's paper entitled "Oldest Evidence of Toolmaking Hominins in a Grassland-Dominated Ecosystem" has been published in September issue of PLoS ONE.In this paper Dr. Plummer and his colleagues demonstrate that grassland-dominated ecosystems did in fact exist during the Plio-Pleistocene, and that early Homo was active in open settings. Comparison with other Oldowan occurrences indicates that by 2.0 Ma hominins, almost certainly of the genus Homo, used a broad spectrum of habitats in East Africa, from open grassland to riparian forest. This strongly contrasts with the habitat usage of Australopithecus, and may signal an important shift in hominin landscape usage.
    PDF
    Doreen Schmitt received a Presidential Adjunct Teaching Award this year.
    Timothy Pugh received a grant from the National Science Foundation supporting archaeological research at the site of Tayasal in Petén, Guatemala. His article Contagion and Alterity: Kowoj Maya Appropriations of European Objects appeared in American Anthropologist. He co-edited the book Maya Worldview at Conquest in which he wrote the Preface and a chapter entitled Maya Sacred Landscapes at Contact. His review of Sanctuaries of Earth, Stone, and Light: The Churches of Northern New Spain,1530–1821 appeared in Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology.
    Jim Moore presented a paper "Too Much History for This Present: The Construction of Cultural Heritage" at Long Island Archaeology: A Public Symposium on Recent Research on September 26, 2009, 1-5pm in 301 Wang Center, Stony Brook University.
    On October 9, 2009, Kate Pechenkina spoke at Harvard University East Asian Archaeology Seminar about "Life in the Early Farming Communities of Northern China."
    Article by Professor Kevin Birth "Time and the Biological Consequences of Globalization" has been selected as an Honorable Mention for the 2009 General Anthropology Division Award for Exemplary Cross-Field Scholarship.
    On September 12 Timothy Pugh spoke at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology about “Spanish Things in Maya Worlds: the Archaeology of First Contact”. In July, he presented a paper Cosas Europeas en el Mundo Maya del Periodo Contacto at the XXIII Simposio de Investigaciones Arqueologías en Guatemala. Dr. Pugh is now the director of Proyecto Arqueológico Tayasal.
    End of the Term Party
    On Wednesday 12/09, the Anthro Club hosted an End of the Term Anthropology Party featuring Anthro-Jeopardy and Bone-Bee contests. The top spot in Anthro-Jeopardy was split among Heather Nitschke, Philip Appleby, Alexandra Brackett, and Nardai Mootoo. Runners up were Jon Claude Gocheekit, Jose Karlos, and Ronveer Chakraborty.

    At first, "Bone-bee," which involved blindly identifying bones inside a black bag, had the jury worried, as nobody could be eliminated initially . After Matilda correctly guessed the first proximal pedal phalanx, Nardai the medial cuneiform, and Josh identified lower second molar, the jury began to deploy fragments. The last two contestants standing were Casey Paganetti and Josh Wilcox, who both identified a scapula based on a small fragment of its inferior angle. The runners-up were Nikki Brigati, Matilda Chanax-Gonzalez, and Nardai Mootoo.



    Queens College Anthropology major Josh Wilcox participated in the excavation of a Paleolithic (presumably) neanderthal site in the southern Caucuses of Armenia this June under the supervision of Daniel Adler of the University of Connecticut. The Middle to Upper Paleolithic inhabitants of the rock shelter where the excavation took place produced prolific amounts of blade tools made from obsidian. The nature of these tools, distributed over the geological span of millenia, reveal a significant amount of sophistication and care in their construction, as well a faithful transmission of the culture through many generations. Associated with these tools were various fragmentary faunal remains, notably bovids and horses, as well as rodent microfauna. The latter likely being a result of later invasive burrowing. Whether these fauna were eaten or merely cohabited with the humans is as of yet unknown.
    In May 2010, Alexander Bauer's book (co-edited with Anna Agbe-Davies), Social Archaeologies of Trade and Exchange was published by Left Coast Press. The goal of this volume is to recognize trade as a fundamentally social activity concerned not only with the movement of goods, but also on the social context and consequences of that exchange. The contributions discuss trade on a range of scales and themes such as exchange as a communicative act, the ways in which exchange transforms the relationship between people and things, the significance of agency and power in contexts of trade, and how sites of consumption and discard speak to processes of exchange.
    Professor Timothy Pugh was awarded a grant from the Wenner-Gren Foundation to support his project “The Colonial Process at Tayasal, Petén, Guatemala.”

    In June 2010, Prof. Mandana Limbert's book, In the Time of Oil: Piety, Memory, and Social Life in an Omani Town, was published by Stanford University Press. Focusing on shifting structures of governance and new forms of sociality as well as on the changes brought by mass schooling, piped water, and the fracturing of close ties with East Africa, Mandana Limbert shows how personal memories and local histories produce divergent notions about proper social conduct, piety, and gendered religiosity. With close attention to the subtleties of everyday life and the details of archival documents, poetry, and local histories, Limbert provides a rich historical ethnography of oil development, piety, and social life on the Arabian Peninsula.

    In May 2010, Prof. Karen Strassler's book, Refracted Visions: Popular Photography and National Modernity in Java, was published by Duke University Press. In this book, Karen Strassler argues that popular photographic practices have played a crucial role in the making of modern national subjects in postcolonial Java. Contending that photographic genres cultivate distinctive ways of seeing and positioning oneself and others within the affective, ideological, and temporal location of Indonesia, she examines genres ranging from state identification photos to pictures documenting family rituals.

    Dr. D. Michael Steffy, an integral member of our departmental community for thirty years, died unexpectedly on December 26, 2009. Throughout his long career at Queens College, Mike worked tirelessly behind the scenes to provide media services and other technical support for the Anthropology teaching faculty and instructional staff. In addition, he offered multiple sections of his own classes nearly every semester, as well as on weekends, during the winter break, and in the summer sessions, for which he served for many years as coordinator. He will be sorely missed.


    Fall 2009
    In October 2009, Prof. Murphy Halliburton's book, Mudpacks and Prozac: Experiencing Ayurvedic, Biomedical, and Religious Healing, In October 2009, Prof. Murphy Halliburton's book, an ethngraphic study of healing in India, was published by Left Coast Press. This book tells about people seeking psychiatric healing choose from an almost dizzying array of therapies-from the medicated mudpacks of Ayurveda, to the pharmacopeia of Western biomedicine, to the spiritual pathways of the world's religions. How do we choose, what do the treatments offer, and how do they cure? In Mudpacks and Prozac, Murphy Halliburton investigates the very different ways in which Western, Ayurvedic, and religious (Christian, Muslim, and Hindu) healing systems define psychiatric problems and cures. He describes people's embodied experiences of therapies that range from soothing to frightening, and explores how enduring pleasure or pain affects healing. And through evocative portraits of patients in Kerala, India-a place of incredible cultural diversity that has become a Mecca for alternative medicine-Halliburton shows how sociopolitical changes around the globe may be limiting the ways in which people seek and experience health care, with negative effects on our quality of health and quality of life.

    Tom Plummer's paper entitled "Oldest Evidence of Toolmaking Hominins in a Grassland-Dominated Ecosystem" has been published in September issue of PLoS ONE.In this paper Dr. Plummer and his colleagues demonstrate that grassland-dominated ecosystems did in fact exist during the Plio-Pleistocene, and that early Homo was active in open settings. Comparison with other Oldowan occurrences indicates that by 2.0 Ma hominins, almost certainly of the genus Homo, used a broad spectrum of habitats in East Africa, from open grassland to riparian forest. This strongly contrasts with the habitat usage of Australopithecus, and may signal an important shift in hominin landscape usage.
    PDF
    Doreen Schmitt received a Presidential Adjunct Teaching Award this year.
    Timothy Pugh received a grant from the National Science Foundation supporting archaeological research at the site of Tayasal in Petén, Guatemala. His article Contagion and Alterity: Kowoj Maya Appropriations of European Objects appeared in American Anthropologist. He co-edited the book Maya Worldview at Conquest in which he wrote the Preface and a chapter entitled Maya Sacred Landscapes at Contact. His review of Sanctuaries of Earth, Stone, and Light: The Churches of Northern New Spain,1530–1821 appeared in Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology.
    Jim Moore presented a paper " Too Much History for This Present: The Construction of Cultural Heritage" at Long Island Archaeology: A Public Symposium on Recent Research on September 26, 2009, 1-5pm in 301 Wang Center, Stony Brook University.
    This summer, archaeology professor Alexander Bauer took 4 Queens College students to Turkey to learn about archaeological field methods and the country's rich history and culture. They visited many museums and important archaeological sites, where the project directors gave them a "behind the scenes" view of how archaeological research is designed and carried out.




    Article by Professor Kevin Birth "Time and the Biological Consequences of Globalization" has been selected as an Honorable Mention for the 2009 General Anthropology Division Award for Exemplary Cross-Field Scholarship.
    On September 12 Timothy Pugh spoke at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology about “Spanish Things in Maya Worlds: the Archaeology of First Contact”. In July, he presented a paper Cosas Europeas en el Mundo Maya del Periodo Contacto at the XXIII Simposio de Investigaciones Arqueologías en Guatemala. Dr. Pugh is now the director of Proyecto Arqueológico Tayasal.
    On October 9, 2009, Kate Pechenkina spoke at Harvard University East Asian Archaeology Seminar about "Life in the Early Farming Communities of Northern China."
    Spring 2009

    On Monday, May 11th, 2009 the Queens College Department of Anthropology hosted the Annual Honors and Awards Ceremony to recognize our outstanding Majors and Minors.
    Student Awards for Department of Anthropology 2008-2009 are:
    Hortense Powdermaker Award: Karina Ortega
    Paul Mahler Memorial Award: Dov Rosenbaum
    Frank Spencer Award: Lauren Alvarez
    Faculty Award: Steven Appel, Sylwia Bednarska, Akash Sookdeo, Rachel Weinstock
    Thesis Honors in Anthropology: Steven Appel, Chiu Leong Ho, Zahava Rubel
    Most Promising Student Award: Tiffany Arbelaez
    Service Award: Chiu Leong Ho (Raymond)

    Honors:
    Majors graduating with honors -
    Majors Graduating in September 2008: Cass Qin
    Majors Graduating in February 2009: Michael Farhangian, Pierre Griffith, Johana Guerra, Coreen Lewis, Kamaljeet Ram, Natasha Singh, Akask Sookdeo, Rachel Weinstock
    Majors Graduating in May 2009: Steven Appel, Sylwia Bednarska, Maria Brandao, Mary Diaz, Nubia Encarnacion, Danielle Farella, Ari Goldstein, Chiu Leong Ho, Karina Ortega, Dov Rosenbaum, Zahava Rubel, Sean Yuzik

    Minors graduating with honors -
    Minors Graduating in September 2008: Bisma Nasar, Ellen Wawryk
    Minors Graduating in February 2009: Julia Dellal, Greg Harris, Renny Kunjbeharry
    Minors Graduating in May 2009: Vanessa Anastasiadis, Karen Gurtman, Cha Huang, Boris Kaylakov, Russell Kulinski, Ariana Miranda, Alexander Pinhas, Adelina Pinkhasova

    Junior Honors in Anthropology-
    2009 Majors: Lauren Alvarez, Tiffany Arbelaez, Roneil Boodram, Jesse Diasparra, Blake Kelminson, Alexander Lord, Melanie Korn, Jennifer Lowerwirt, Ashley Mallette, Claudia Suarez

    2009 Minors: Katherine Carrasco, Anthony Carbone, Anthony Corsitto, Krzysztof Momot
    Click to see pictures

    Winter 2009
    John Collins' essay "Historical and Cultural Patrimony in Brazil: Recent Works in Portuguese" has appeared in the Latin American Research Review, Volume 44, no. 1 (February 2009).

    Timothy Pugh has six chapters in the book "The Kowoj: Identity, Migration, and Geopolitics in Late Postclassic Petén, Guatemala," edited by Prudence Rice and Don Rice, published by University Press of Colorado, Boulder:
    † Residential and Domestic Contexts at Zacpetén
    † The Kowoj and the Lacandon: Migrations and Identities
    † Zacpetén and the Kowoj: Field Methods and Chronologies (senior author with Prudence Rice).
    † Kowoj Ritual Performance and Societal Representation at Zacpetén (senior author with Prudence Rice)
    † Zacpetén Structure 719: the Last Noble Residence (senior author with Prudence Rice and Leslie Cecil)
    † Defensive Architecture and the Context of Warfare at Zacpetén (junior author with Prudence Rice, M., Don S. Rice, Timothy W. Pugh, and Rómulo Sánchez Polo.
    On January 7th, Professor Kevin Birth gave a talk at the Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan as part of the "24 Hour Program on the Concept of Time" associated with the ANYSPACEWHATEVER exhibit. His talk is called "Illiteracies of the Imagination, Necromantic Devices, and How Clocks Make Us Stupid."
    Kate Pechenkina's comments on a paper by Wilbur et al. "Diet, Tuberculosis, and the Paleopathological Record" appeared in the December 2008 issue of Current Anthropology.
    Fall 2008
    Queens College Graduate and Mellon Scholar Chris Parisano was awarded the Society for Urban and Transnational Anthropology (SUNTA) prize for best undergraduate paper at the November 2008 American Anthropological Association Annual Meetings in San Francisco. Chris' award-winning analysis of the ongoing transformation of Flushing is entitled "Junked Landscapes and Gypsies: Morality, Exchange, and the Production of Urban Space in Willets Point, Queens" and draws on research undertaken as part of his senior honors thesis supervised by John Collins.
    Mandana Limbert published several papers this year:
    †2008, with Elizabeth Ferry, Timely Assets: The Politics of Resources and their Temporalities, Santa Fe: School of American Research, Advanced Seminar Series.
    † 2008 "Depleted Futures: Anticipating the End of Oil in Oman" In Timely Assets: The Politics of Resources and their Temporalities, edited by Mandana E. Limbert and Elizabeth Ferry. Santa Fe: School of American Research, Advanced Seminar Series.
    † 2008 book review, "Nostalgia for the Modern: State Secularism and Everyday Politics in Turkey" by Esra Ozyurek, American Ethnologist. 35(4): xxx-xxx.
    † 2008 "The Sacred Date: Gifts of God in an Omani Town" Ethnos. 73(3): 361-376.
    † 2008 "In the Ruins of Bahla: Reconstructed Forts and Crumbling Walls in an Omani Town" Social Text 95. 26(2): 83-103.
    Timothy Pugh and Cameron McNeil organized the session Discourses of Distance among the Maya at the Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Dr. McNeil presented The Watery Origins of the World: "The Place of the Cattails" in Mesoamerica and Dr. Pugh presented Spanish Things in Maya Worlds.
    Lauren Alvarez, an anthropology major, presented a poster on her research at the MACUB (Metropolitan Association of College and University Biologists) conference on November 1 2008 at Montclair University in NJ.
    October 29, Dr. William Parry (CUNY Hunter) gave a talk entitled "HUMAN AND ANIMAL SACRIFICE IN ANCIENT MESOAMERICA" to the students ad faculty of our department.
    John Collins published "Patrimony, Public Health, and National Culture: The Commodification and Redemption of Origins in Neoliberal Brazil." in the June 2008 issue of Critique of Anthropology and his article " 'But What if I Should Need to Defecate in your Neighborhood, Madame?': Empire, Redemption and the 'Tradition of the Oppressed' in a Brazilian Historical Center' appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Cultural Anthropology. One of Professor Collins' fieldwork photographs was also chosen for the issue's cover.
    On September 23rd, during a panel discussion on Discovering JOHN BOWNE: Archaeology, Architecture And Flushing's Beginnings, James Moore gave a talk recounting his experience in archaeological investigation of the Bowne House.
    Tom Plummer is co-author of a paper entitled "Habitat preference of extant African bovids based on astragalus morphology: operationalizing ecomorphology for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction," forthcoming in the November issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science. In this paper, Dr. Plummer and his colleagues discuss the raw material selection and transport behaviors of Oldowan hominins, based on their analysis of stone artifact assemblages from the Kanjera South Formation, South Rachuonyo District, Kenya. Read the paper
    Larissa Swedell's review of "Baboon Metaphysics: The Evolution of a Social Mind," a book by Dorothy Cheney and Richard Seyfarth, appeared in the September issue of the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.
    Tom Plummer is co-author of a paper entitled "Oldowan behavior and raw material transport: perspectives from the Kanjera Formation," published in the August issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science. Read the paper
    Spring 2008
    On Monday, May 12th, 2008 the Queens College Department of Anthropology hosted the Annual Honors and Awards Ceremony to recognize our outstanding Majors and Minors.
    Student Awards for Department of Anthropology 2007 are:
    Hortense Powdermaker Award: Sebastian Ramirez and Lauren Talerman
    Paul Mahler Memorial Award: Semyon Gurgov
    Lynn Ceci Archaeology Award: Theresa Barbaro
    Frank Spencer Award: Priya Mangru
    Faculty Award: Semyon Gurgov, Sebastian Ramirez, Bahar Simani, Debra Sherman, Lauren Talerman
    Thesis Honors in Anthropology: Theresa Barbaro Jo Colagiacomi Fabian Fareshtefar Katherine Malone Christopher Parisano Sebastian Ramirez Lauren Talerman
    Most Promising Student Award: Michael Farhangian and Juliana Giraldo Ramirez
    Service Award: Katherine Malone

    Honors:
    Majors graduating with honors -
    Ahn, Min Amante, Ashley Antonio, Claudia Barbaro, Theresa Cai, Yanmei Colagiacomi, Jo Colon, Wiliana Fereshtefar, Fabian Gordon, Jeffrey Gurgov, Semyon
    Ma, Vivian Malone, Katherine Parisano, Chris Philippeaux, Giovannah Ramirez, Sebastian Salinas, Jennifer Simani, Bahar D. Sherman, Debra Talerman, Lauren

    Minors graduating with honors -
    Craft, Lois Fernandez, Raquel Kimyagorov, Edward Nasar, Bisma Singleman, Corinna Szymanski, Ewa M.

    Junior Honors in Anthropology-
    majors: Sylvia Bednarska Mary D. Diaz Danielle Farella Michael Farhangian Juliana Giraldo Ramirez Ari Goldstein John Keane Javier G. Laspina Dianne Lobo Delaila Lugo Priya Mangru Karina Ortega
    minors: Julia Dellal Sochima Eze

    Alexander A. Bauer (Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 2006) has joined the Department of Anthropology as an Assistant Professor starting Fall 2008.

        Alexander Bauer conducts archaeological research on the Black Sea coast of Turkey, and is interested in problems related to cultural interaction and trade in both the past and present. His other research focuses on how archaeological knowledge is constructed and cultural heritage law and policy. He will be teaching Introduction to Archaeology, History of Anthropology, and the Archaeology of the Near East.

    Spring 2008
    On March 24th, 2008, Dr. Cameron L. McNeil was named the recipient of the 2008 Mary W. Klinger Book Award for the publication she edited, entitled Chocolate in Mesoamerica: A Cultural History of Cacao, published by University Press of Florida. The Klinger Book Award is among the highest honors awarded by the Society for ECONOMIC BOTANY. Dr. McNeil will be honored in Durham, North Carolina June 5th at the society's annual meeting.

    Dr. Daniel F. Austin, Chair of the Awards Committee, said “Even for those of us who are addicted to chocolate, this book opens welcome new vistas. While many of us have worked in forests with wild Theobroma, and in areas of cultivation, most of us have a limited exposure to the cultural history of the plants. By bringing together distinct fields into one single resource, Dr. McNeil has done everyone a great service. The story of chocolate is as savory as the product!”

    The Mary W. Klinger Book Award was established in 1996 and is annually awarded by the Society for an outstanding book publication. The Society for Economic Botany is the largest international scientific organization fostering and encouraging research and education on the past, present, and future uses of plants by people.
    In April, several anthropology faculty members gave talks during the 77th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists in Columbus, Ohio (April 9 - April 12, 2008):
  • Larissa Swedell, J. Saunders, M. Pines, A. Schreier and B. Davis. - Alternative reproductive strategies in male hamadryas baboons: leaders, followers, and solitary males.
  • Jennifer Muller - The frequency and etiology of rib fractures in the skeletal remains of Washington DC's African American poor
  • Sara Stinson - Factors influencing relative sitting height at high altitude.
  • Nelson Ting - Extinction of critically endangered West African colobus monkeys will lead to a major loss in molecular diversity.

  • During the 73rd Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology in Vancouver (March 26 - March 30, 2008), several anthropology faculty members gave talks based on their current research:
  • Aaron Kendall—Material Culture and Viking Age Trade: Comparison of Artifacts from Icelandic Farm Sites.
  • Cameron McNeil—The Fragrance of Elite Identity: Flowers in Maya Temples and Tombs at Copan, Honduras.
  • Ekaterina Pechenkina and Xiaolin Ma — Trajectories of Health in Early Farming Communities of East Asia.
  • Timothy Pugh —Elite Uses of Spanish Material Culture in Contact Period Petén, Guatemala.
  • Joseph Ferraro, Tom Plummer, Briana Pobiner, Jim Oliver and Laura Bishop—Late Pliocene zooarchaeology of Kanjera South, Kenya.

  • Kevin Birth gave a talk at Franklin and Marshall College on Feb 18th. The title of his talk is "The Meaningful Irregularity of Time." The event is sponsored by Anthropology, Music, and Africana Studies.

    Kevin Birth also has a new article out in the The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute called "The Creation of Coevalness and the Danger of Homochronism."

    Fall 2007
    Several Antthropology faculty members delivered oral presentations to the 106th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association held between November 28 and December 2, 2007 in Washington DC. Dr. DeBoer delivered his talk on "ethnogenesis in the long and short run," to a symposium on Long-Term Patterns of Ethnogenesis in Indigenous Amazonia organized by Jonathan Hill and Alf Hornborg. Dr. McNei organized a symposium on Mesoamerican Relationships with Nature. Dr. Pugh gave a talk on his recent research in Guatemala to a symposium entitled "Bridging Identities: Multidisciplinary Approaches to Maya Ethnicity in Long Term Perspective" organized by Bethany Myers.
    Dr. Kevin Birth's book "Bacchanalian Sentiments: Musical Experiences and Political Counterpoints in Trinidad" is forthcoming in January 2008 from Duke University Press. In this book Dr. Birth draws on fieldwork he conducted in one of Trinidad’s ethnically diverse rural villages to explore the relationship between music and social and political consciousness on the island. He describes how Trinidadians use the affective power of music and the physiological experience of performance to express and work through issues related to identity, ethnicity, and politics. He looks at how the performers and audience members relate to different musical traditions. Turning explicitly to politics, Birth recounts how Trinidadians used music as a means of making sense of the attempted coup d’état in 1990 and the 1995 parliamentary election, which resulted in a tie between the two major political parties. Bacchanalian Sentiments is an innovative ethnographic analysis of the significance of music, and particular musical forms, in the everyday lives of rural Trinidadians.
    Dr. Kate Pechenkina has two chapters in the recently releasededited volume Ancient Health: Skeletal Indicators of Agricultural and Economic Intensification, edited by Mark Nathan Cohen and Gillian M. M. Crane-Kramer. University Press of Florida. The two chapters are entitled "Skeletal biology of the Central Peruvian Coast: consequences of changing population density and progressive dependence on maize agriculture" PDF and "Diet and health in the Neolithic of the Wei and Yellow River Basins, Northern China." PDF



    Consequences of Contact: Language Ideologies and Sociocultural Transformations in Pacific Societies, a volume edited by
    Miki Makihara and Bambi B. Schieffelin has been released by Oxford University Press.

         Drawing on ethnographic and linguistic analyses, this edited volume examines situations of intertwined linguistic and cultural change unfolding in specific Pacific locations in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Its overarching concern is with the multiple ways that processes of historical change have shaped and been shaped by linguistic ideologiesreflexive sensibilities about languages and language useheld by Pacific peoples and other agents of change. The essays demonstrate that language and linguistic practices are linked to changing consciousness of self and community through notions of agency, morality, affect, authority, and authenticity.


    Summer 2007
    Mandana Limbert received ACLS (American Council of Learned Societies) fellowship for this year (2007-2008) for her project Oman, Zanzibar, and the Politics of Becoming Arab.
    Larissa Swedell's 2006-2007 Fulbright Scholarship at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, was renewed through the end of 2007. She will continue to teach at UCT and conduct research on South African chacma baboons until her return to New York in January 2008.
    Dr. Kevin Birth's paper, entitled "The Creation of Coevalness and the Danger of Homochronism," has been accepted for publication by the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute.
    Several new faculty members have joined the Department of Anthropology starting Fall 2007:
  • Frances Forrest, a Chancellor's Fellow at the Graduate Center's PhD Program in Anthropology, will be teaching Introduction to Human Evolution (ANTH102). Her research focuses on paleoanthropology.
  • Beatriz Perez-Sweeney, a recent graduate of Columbia University, will be offering Introduction to Human Evolution (ANTH102).
    Her doctoral dissertation focuses on the molecular systematics of Leontopithecus (a group of New World primates) and population genetics of L. chrysopygus.
  • Ellas Kalamida , a recent graduate of Rutgers University, will be offering Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (ANTH101). She is a cultural anthropologist researching the symbolism of the revival of some old "rebetika" songs and their use for wedding parties.
  • May
    On Monday, May 8th, 2007 the Queens College Department of Anthropology hosted the Annual Honors and Awards Ceremony to recognize our outstanding graduating Majors and Minors.

    Student Awards for Department of Anthropology 2007 are:

    Hortense Powdermaker Award:
    Bracha Feit

    Paul Mahler Memorial Award:
    Simon Wong and Patricia Sherin

    Lynn Ceci Archaeology Award:
    Yocasta Peña-Brent

    Faculty Award:
    Bracha Feit and Raina Kulinski

    Thesis Honors:
    Yocasta Peña-Brent, Bracha Feit, José Vila

    Most Promising Student Award:
    Karina Ortega

    Service Award:
    Yocasta Peña-Brent

    Honors:
    Majors graduating with honors -
    Bracha Feit, Meredith Ilchert, Simarpreet Kaur, Raina Kulinski, Tanya Moradi, Yocasta Peña-Brent, Patricia Sherin, Nicole Vega, Simon Wong, Jessie Yang, Martyna Zmijewska

    Minors graduating with honors -
    Sophie Antonopoulos, Linda Benzakarya, Kanwal Chaudhary, Melissa Chen, Joey Cohen, Lisa Ebe, Christie Lech, Olivia Olbrei, Markos Papadatos
    April, 2007
  • On April 29, at the Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Warren DeBoer, served as a discussant in a symposium organized by former Queens College faculty member John Blitz, entitled "Neighborhood, Community, and Polity: Alternative Interpretations of Mississippian Societies."

  • On April 26, at the Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Tim Pugh gave a talk discussing his recent research in Guatemala, entitled "The Archaeology of Contact and Colonialism in Peten, Guatemala." Kate Pechenkina presented a talk on burial status and skeletal health at the Middle Yangshao site of Xipo in Northern China. Cameron McNeil gave a talk entitled "Lessons for the Present in Ancient Land-use Patterns."

  • On April 19, Sam Byrd gave a talk about his recent research, entitled "People Left Behind: Hidden Native Populations on the Gulf Coast," at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Anthropology of North America (SANA).

  • A paper by Dr. Kevin Birth, entitled "Time and the Biological Consequences of Globalization" has been published in the April issue of Current Anthropology. In this paper Professor Birth discusses temporal conflicts between locations on the globe, desynchronization of biological cycles, and lack of correspondence between those cycles and social life. The full text of this paper is available in CURRENT ANTHROPOLOGY Volume 48, Number 2:215-236. PDF
    March, 2007
  • On March 27, Tom Plummer and his collaborators, James Oliver, Colleen Delaney-Rivera, Fritz Hertel, Francis Forrest, and Jason Hodgson, presented a poster entitled "Expanding the taxonomic range of omnivores and carnivores in feeding experiments and the application of actualistic tooth mark data to zooarcheological analysis" to the Paleoanthropology Society 2007 Annual Meeting held at the Penn Museum at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

  • On March 31, Kate Pechenkina and her collaborator, Ma Xiaolin, presented a poster entitled "Work or violence: Tramatic injuries during the Chinese Neolithic," to the orfganized symposium on Bioarchaeological Perspectives on Migration and Human Health in Ancient East Asia. The symposium was held as a part of Seventy-Sixth Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.

  • On March 30, an anthropology major, Patty Sherin, presented a poster entitled "Radiography of the pubic symphysis: an alternative method for the age at death estimation of human skeletal remains." to the Seventy-Sixth Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.

  • On March 16, Professor Tim Pugh gave a guest lecture to the Anthropology Department of the University at Albany, SUNY, on his recent research in Maya Archaeology.


  • Professor Warren DeBoer has a chapter entitled
    "Salient representations of the American Past" in the recently
    releasededited volume A Pre-Columbian World, edited by
    Jeffrey Quilter and Mary Miller. Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, D. C.



  • On January 12, Professor Warren DeBoer gave a talk to the Biannual Meeting of Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America (SALSA), at Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  • Two new Adjunct Faculty Members will be joining the Department of Anthropology starting Spring 2007:

    Cameron McNeil, a recent CUNY graduate, currently conducts research at Copan, Honduras. She will be offering Ecology and Culture (ANTH 302).

    Aaron Kendall, Ph. D. Candidate at the CUNY Graduate Center, will be offering Introduction to Archaeology (ANTH 103). His research interests include North Atlantic Archaeology, the Viking Age, and Medieval economies and trade.

  • Cameron McNeil, who will teach Ecology and Culture in Spring 2007, recently published an edited volume called Chocolate in Mesoamerica: A Cultural History of Cacao. This volume brings together scholars in the fields of archaeology, history, art history, linguistics, epigraphy, botany, chemistry, and cultural anthropology to explore the domestication, preparation, representation, and significance of cacao in ancient and modern communities of the Americas, with a concentration on its use in Mesoamerica.
         From the botanical structure and chemical makeup of Theobroma cacao and methods of identifying it in the archaeological record, to the importance of cacao during the Classic period in Mesoamerica, to the impact of European arrival on the production and use of cacao, to contemporary uses in the Americas, this volume provides a richly informed account of the history and cultural significance of chocolate.
         Dr. Timothy Pugh also has a chapter called Cacao, Gender, and the Northern Lacandon God House in this volume.

  • During the month of November, serving as a forensic linguist, faculty member Doreen Schmitt participated in preliminary investigations relating to allegations against a municipal official of "contract steering" (deliberate wording of an open bid civil contract in such a manner that only a particular company/contractor offers the product/service). Although she was unable to adequately substantiate a claim of "non-genericity" (i.e., specificity) of the linguistic terminology involved, she did, however, uncover a possible "smoking gun" during the preparation of her report to the prosecutors. Schmitt alone requested and examined the original approved contract bid proposal document and noted that it differed significantly and critically from the alleged "true" copy on the contract in circulation--namely with regard to the subsequent insertion of the very linguistic terms at issue. This evidence strongly suggested that the defendant willfully and illicitly altered the approved original so as to steer the bidding process.

  • On November 18, Patty Sherin, an Anthropology major, received the student prize for best poster presented to the Biological Anthropology Section during the 105th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association in San Jose. Her poster was entitled "Radiography of the pubic symphysis: aging human skeletal remains".

  • On November 16, Professor Murphy Halliburton gave a talk on his recent research to a session entitled "Resistant to Treatment: Drug-resistant Disease as a Medical, Social, and Public Health Problem" during the 105th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association in San Jose.

  • During the last week of October Professor Warren DeBoer and Professor Jim Moore gave presentations to Foundations of Archaeological Inquiry Conference on "Invisible Citizens: Slavery in Ancient Pre-State Societies" at Snowbird, Utah

  • On November 16, Patty Sherin,an Anthropology major, presented a poster entitled "RADIOGRAPHY OF THE PUBIC SYMPHYSIS: AGING HUMAN SKELETAL REMAINS" to the 105th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association in San Jose.

  • On October 28, Francisco Mesa and Grace Seo, anthropology majors, with Marc Tollis, a biology major, presented a poster entitled "Evaluation of two sampling methods to assess vegetation in an Acacia-Scrub Savannah" at the Metropolitan Association of College and University Biologists conference 8.

  • Markos Papadatos, anthropology manor, has recently published two articles in The Knight News. His articles are entitled " Justice: For the Individual or the Immigrant?" and " "Little Children," Big Movie."

  • Lauren Talerman,an Anthropology majorwone Boren Undergraduate Scholarship to study Arabic in Egypt this past summer. Read about Lauren Talerman in Queens College Faculty and Staff News.

  • During the first week of October, Patty Sherin,an Anthropology major, was visiting the National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C. She obtained radiographs of more than 100 os coxae belonging to modern human skeletons from the Robert J. Terry Anatomical Skeletal Collection while at the museum. This collection consists of the skeletons of individuals with a known age at death and a record of their medical history, allowing a controlled study of age related changes in the pubic symphysis.

  • A paper by Markos Papadatos, an Anthropology minor, entitled "Queens College Wins Cisco Award" has been published in The Knight News. Read the paper.

  • Doreen Schmitt provided expert testimony as a forensic linguist which contributed to a favorable settlement for the plaintiffs in an age discrimination civil lawsuit . This positive outcome of the case resulted even despite a prior finding of "no reasonable cause" by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) against the plaintiffs.

  • Francisco and Grace cook dinner at Nachisar National Park

    This summer, two Anthropology majors, Grace Seo and Francisco Mesa, attended a field course in Ethiopia. They visited three national parks: Bale Mountain National Park, Nachisar National Park, and Awash National Park, home to many endemic species of plants and animals. At Bale Mountain National Park, students witnessed many environmental zones, ranging from Afro-Alpine at the highest elevations, 4,300 m above sea level, to tropical rain forest at lower elevations. The students got an opportunity to see four species of monkeys, including hamadryas and anubis baboons, black and white colobus monkeys and vervet monkeys, as well as many other mammals, some of them endemic and very rare animals (Ethiopian wolf, mountain Nyala). The field course was offered by Christine Tuaillon, a former CUNY Anthropology graduate student and Instructor at Nassau Community College with the help of Stephane Boissinot, an Assistant Professor of Biology at Queens College.