QC Rosenthal Library's Chaney-Goodman-Schwerner Clock Tower / Click to Enlarge

Queens College
The City University of New York

 


February 2011 - Black History Month

QC Chaney-Goodman-Schwerner Clock Tower Plaque in Rosenthal Library / Click to Enlarge


This web site was initiated in January 2005 by the Black History Month Committee of Queens College.  See also our archived February 2005, February 2006, and February 2007, February 2008, February 2009 and February 2010 pages which include a variety of related resources.  Click on each image above for a larger version.



The College's Black History Month Committee is pleased to present the following programs as food for reflection and thought.  The programs that we design each year for Black History Month are specifically * not * designed "For Black Students Only." They are designed for all members of the College community. We hope these programs and events will help foster within the campus community a better understanding of people and events of the time, of each other, and of how it all relates to our lives today.

The images at the top of this page are of our Benjamin S. Rosenthal Library's Chaney-Goodman-Schwerner Clock Tower (photo by S. Lefkoe), and of the Chaney-Goodman-Schwerner Clock Tower dedication plaque (photo by J. Castellan). Click on each for larger images. More information about this may be found in our February 2005 archived pages. The plaque is in the Rosenthal Library entry foyer, near the Books and Bytes Cafe. The text on the clock tower dedication plaque is as follows:

THEY DIED FOR OUR FREEDOM
IN THE SUMMER OF 1964, QUEENS COLLEGE STUDENT ANDREW GOODMAN
JOINED THE MISSISSIPPI FREEDOM SUMMER PROJECT.  HE WAS ASSIGNED TO WORK ON
VOTER REGISTRATION WITH JAMES EARL CHANEY AND MICHAEL SCHWERNER.
RETURNING FROM A VISIT TO A RURAL CHURCH, THEY WERE KIDNAPPED AND MURDERED.
THEIR DEATHS INSPIRED COUNTLESS OTHERS TO CONTINUE THE STRUGGLE
FOR EQUALITY AND JUSTICE FOR ALL AMERICANS.

Dedicated on May 10, 1989

 


Looking Backward, Moving Forward

Schedule of Events - February 2011

Daily Schedule (Tentative)


Wednesday February 9


Documentary Film: Eyes on the Prize - No Easy Walk 1961-1963 --- Remembering The Civil Rights Movement and Its Leaders
Narrated by Julian Bond
Free Hour - 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Campbell Dome                                            .                                                                                 
Cliq Event



Wednesday February 16


A Glimpse From The Past To The Present Through The Eyes of African American Women  Writers And Poets: Jessie Redmon Fauset, Zora Neale Hurston, Maya Angelou
Free Hour  12:15 to 1:30 p.m.
Campbell Dome

Speaker: Prof. Saundra Colon of the SEEK Program

Cliq Event

A comparative analysis of emotional responses to the plight of African American Women as expressed through literature and poetry from the past to the present .



Thursday February 17

Julian Bond on "James Forman's Contributions to the Struggle For Social Justice" - with Forman Family Members and QC Students Discussing His Legacy: "Looking Backward, Moving Forward".
5 p.m. -7pm
Rosenthal Library Auditorium Room 230
Free and Open to the Public
Distinguished guest speaker Honorable Julian Bond
Cliq Event for students

Civil rights leader Julian Bond will speak at Queens College about the legacy of the civil rights movement and its lessons for today's world. This event celebrates the recent acquisition by the Queens College Civil Rights Archive of the personal library of civil rights leader James Forman (1928-2005). The James Forman Library is comprised of thousands of books and pamphlets as well as many audio and videotapes.

Julian Bond was one of the founders of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and later the first president of the Southern Poverty Law Center. From 1998 to 2010, he served as chairman of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Earlier he served in the Georgia General Assembly for two decades.

Bond and Forman worked closely together in SNCC and Bond has written that "Forman is one of the under-appreciated figures of the modern civil rights movement. His autobiography, The Making of Black Revolutionaries, is a classic," and credits Forman as having had an “enormous influence” on him personally, SNCC, and the whole civil rights movement. Julian Bond and James Forman were both early, long-time, and important leaders in shaping the struggle for social justice in the United States.

Co-sponsored by the Africana Studies Program, Special Collections & Archives of the Queens College Libraries, the SEEK Program, and a growing number of student organizations.

For more information contact Africana Studies (718-997-2845) or Special Collections & Archives (718-997-3650).


Wednesday February 23

 
Documentary Film: " The End of Poverty?" Think Again .

Free Hour: 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.                                                    
Rosenthal Library room 230
Moderator: Professor: Francois Pierre-Louis, Ph.D, of the Political Sciences Department
Cliq Event


With so much wealth in the World why is there still so much poverty?  A thought provoking  and very timely documentary by award-winning filmmaker, Philippe Diaz, revealing that poverty is not an accident.


Thursday February 24


The Horn - a play about Louis Armstrong's life written by Tyler Rivenbark,  a graduate of the Queens College Master of Fine Arts Program in Creative Writing.
5:00 p.m to 7:00 p.m.                                                                               

Little Theater - Rathaus #213
Cliq Event

Horn is a journey into the sadness that lie behind a smile, even one as large as Louis Armstrong.   This behind-the-scenes look at one of the world's greatest entertainers explores what a man wants when he has everything. 



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