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ALVERO, ALICIA

BEELER, JEFF

BODNAR, RICHARD

BOROD, JOAN

BROWN, BRUCE

BRUMBAUGH, CLAUDIA

BRUMBERG, JOSHUA

FAN, JIN

FIENUP, DANIEL

FOLDI, NANCY

GOODWIN, RENEE

HALPERIN, JEFFREY

HEMMES, NANCY

JOHNSON, RAY

JONES, EMILY

LANSON, ROBERT

LI, ANDREA

NIKULINA, VALENTINA

NOMURA, YOKO

PYTTE, CAROLYN

RAMSEY, PHILLIP

RANALDI, ROBERT

SNEED, JOEL

STEWART, JENNIFER

STORBECK, JUSTIN

STURMEY, PETER

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JENNIFER STEWART

Title Assistant Professor
Area Clinical Psychology
Ph.D. University of Illinois, 2008
Office SB A312
E-mail jennifer.stewart@qc.cuny.edu
Office Phone
   

Professional Activities:

    Society Memberships:
        American Psychological Association
        Association for Psychological Science
        Society for Psychophysiological Research
        Society for Biological Psychiatry

Research Description:

My research employs subjective reports (questionnaires and clinical interviews), behavioral methods, electroencephalography (EEG), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how brain patterns linked to cognition, emotion, and their interaction intersect with individual differences in substance use, depression, and anxiety. People who are addicted to drugs and/or suffering from severe depression and anxiety often have difficulties processing emotions and making decisions that are evident in patterns of brain activity and behavior. I want to see if we can identify markers of risk for these disorders in young adults who have not yet transitioned to chronic mental health problems. For instance, are aspects of decision-making (such as selecting a particular choice and receiving positive or negative feedback on the basis of that choice) behaviorally and neurally impaired in young adults who: (1) use prescription amphetamines, cocaine, and/or marijuana; and/or (2) have low versus high anxiety and depression symptoms? How do pleasant and unpleasant emotion inductions (e.g., soft touch brushstroke or breathing restriction) influence brain and behavior during decision-making in these young adults? Do brain and behavior patterns in these young adults resemble those of chronic drug users? Can these patterns predict which young adults transition to substance use disorders in the future? I hope to identify markers of risk for addiction and mood/anxiety disorders that can be used in collaborative prevention and treatment intervention efforts.

Selected Publications:

    Stewart, J. L., May, A. C., Poppa, N., Davenport, P. W., Tapert, S. F., & Paulus, M. P. (in press). You are the danger: Attenuated insula response in methamphetamine users during aversive interoceptive decision making. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

    Paulus, M. P., & Stewart, J. L. (2014). Interoception and drug addiction. Neuropharmacology, 76, 342-350.

    May, A. C., Stewart, J. L., Migliorini, R., Tapert, S. F., & Paulus, M. P. (2013). Methamphetamine dependent individuals show attenuated brain response to pleasant interoceptive stimuli. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 131, 238-246.

    Migliorini, R., Stewart, J. L., May, A. C., Tapert, S. F., & Paulus, M. P. (2013). What do you feel? Adolescent drug and alcohol users show altered brain response to pleasant interoceptive stimuli. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 133, 661-668.

    Stewart, J. L., Flagan, T. M., May, A. C., Reske, M., Simmons, A. N., & Paulus, M. P. (2013). Young adults at risk for stimulant dependence show reward dysfunction during reinforcement-based decision making. Biological Psychiatry, 73, 235-241.

    Stewart, J. L., Parnass, J. M., May, A. C., Davenport, P. W., & Paulus, M. P. (2013). Altered frontocingulate activation during aversive interoceptive processing in young adults transitioning to problem stimulant use. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, 7.